Luck be a lady tonight

Sometimes no matter how hard you try, luck will be the deciding factor in winning or losing a fight.

I was chilling on a solo bubble in my normal system. A blue had come into system and asked to camp and shoot the shit. I obliged and we sat around. Traffic all weekend had been oddly light; our CFC neighbors were off doing something dastardly out in Sov-land.

A bomber had come into system and ended up in our bubble. Easy prey if you can get the scram on quick enough. A lot of bombers have stabbed setups, so you never know if primary tackle can hold one. He died in a blaze of glory.

But

I didn’t see his alliance mate slip in system. I see that a Rupture on d-scan. Normally, it is a 50/50 chance I’d take on a Ruppy in my Vengeance. Ruppies have small drone bays and no tracking bonuses. My only issue would be neuts and tank. If I had time, I would normally see if the pilot has a Ruppy loss and check out fit.

I didn’t have the time.

The Ruppy lands and my buddy asks if we were going to engage…of course we will.

I tackle and start shooting. Hob IIs are spit out. Damn. I prefer to see Warriors as they can be completely ignored. I take some pot shots at a few before settling in on killing the Ruppy. He hits armor and has some tremendous rep cycles.

I’m lucky tonight. My partner is applying cap pressure from his Pilgrim.

Between his drones, neuts, and my spunky little Vengeance, we take him down rather quickly. He rage logs, so his pod dies, too. I am certain he worked on his fit to be just the thing to wreck havoc in our camp. I believe an Inty showed up as well, but knew to stay the hell away from the Pilgrim.

The Ruppy pilot didn’t know about the Pilgrim. How would he know? OUCH does not fly with them usually.

Pure luck… and we were on the receiving end.

Warfare in general, regardless of planning, relies a lot on luck. There are some things you just can’t plan for. For instance, in the Battle of Midway, 3 US dive bomber squadrons were able to attack the Japanese carrier force together. It was happenstance: there was no coordination between carrier flights. A fourth flight actually never even found the Japanese fleet. A torpedo squadron had only just earlier commenced an attack, bringing down the aerial protection to a low level. Sheer luck. And it was a significant battle which helped swing the tide of the war (there were other flights and bombings during that engagement, btw).

Luck. Chance. Happenstance. Fate. Providence. Fortune.

How many fights have you been in where you throw yourself to the winds and fight on the odd chance something happens where you might win…or at least survive? The enemy FC disconnects. A third party drops a cyno. You warp in at zero and they’re coming back from a ranged POS bash. You are using the perfect ammo even though you forgot to change it from the last fight. That impossibly difficult ship to jam just happens to hit every time…on an off-racial.

All sorts of things happen. Things you cannot plan for. Things you cannot truly anticipate to happen.

Luck.

And it makes fighting in EVE just that much more fun.

-Ze

3 thoughts on “Luck be a lady tonight

  1. I like how the luck factor keeps Eve pvp interesting – and fun.
    I was thinking about the rage log and how I’ve been seeing some “pvp tears” now that I’ve started to spend time on a bubble out in null-sec. Before I would read about all the “miner tears” and how hilarious many people think they are (and they really can be – also note I’ve never caused any) – but I find a whiny pvper way more fascinating. The losing control and sort saying “Hey, you’re doing it (pvp) wrong!” is… well whiny. I’m always surprised to see rage chat.

  2. “How many fights have you been in where you throw yourself to the winds and fight on the odd chance something happens where you might win…or at least survive? ”

    You’d be surprised…or maybe you wouldn’t!

  3. Pingback: Blood flows red on the killboard | 7 Reasons

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